J. Assessment Checklists

11. Logistics

a. Airports

  • Identify the airport being assessed by:
    • Name.
    • Designator.
    • Location.
    • Elevation.
  • Describe the current condition of facilities.
  • Ascertain whether the airport is fully operational. Daylight hours only?
  • Furnish information on usable runway lengths and location(s).
  • Determine whether taxiways, parking areas, and cargo handling areas are intact.
  • Establish whether runway and approach lights are operating.
  • Specify which navigational aids are operating.
  • Describe available communications facilities.
  • Determine whether the terminal building is operating.
  • Check the availability and cost of aviation fuel.
  • Find out if facilities exist for mandatory aircrew rest.
  • Explore whether the cargo handling area can be lit for night cargo operations.
  • Determine what cargo handling equipment is available, including fuel and operators:
    • Forklifts (number, capacity).
    • Scissors lift (capacity).
    • Cargo dollies (number).
    • Trucks with drivers and laborers for hand unloading.
  • Determine what startup equipment is available, including fuel and operators.
  • Describe maintenance operations (facilities, personnel, hours).
  • Outline what storage is available:
    • Covered?
    • At the airport? Off airport? How far?
    • Capacity and suitability for storage of foods or other perishables?

b. Civil Aviation

  • Find out whether arrangements can be made for prompt overflight and landing clearances.
  • Ascertain that the air controller service is functioning.
  • Specify working hours for airport personnel.
  • Explore having "no objections" fees or "royalty" fees waived or paid locally.
  • Find out if arrangements can be made to work around the clock, including customs.
  • Identify personnel to tally and document cargo when received and transshipped.
  • Ascertain that the host government will accept deliveries by means of military as well as civil aircraft.
  • Describe security arrangements.
  • Determine what repairs and/or auxiliary equipment would be needed to increase airport capacity. How soon can local authorities be expected to restore service?
  • Determine if any local air carriers exist and what their availability and rates are.

c. Alternative Aircraft

  • Identify any usable airports or suitable helicopter landing sites in the disaster zone.
  • Determine the local availability and cost of helicopters and/ or fixed wing aircraft.
  • Estimate their capacity.
  • Identify the owners/agents.
  • Determine the availability and cost of fuel.

d. Seaports

  • Identify the port being assessed by:
    • Name and location.
    • Current description of the condition of the facilities.
    • Whether the port is fully operational. Daylight hours only?
    • Security fences/facilities.
    • Percentage of port losses reported.
    • Collection for port losses possible?
  • Determine whether the disaster has altered any of the following physical characteristics of the port:
    • Depth of approach channels.
    • Harbor.
    • Turning basin.
    • Alongside piers/wharves.
    • Availability of lighters.
  • Determine whether the disaster has blocked or damaged port facilities:
    • Locks.
    • Canals.
    • Piers/wharfs.
    • Sheds.
    • Bridges.
    • Water/fuel storage facilities.
    • Communications facilities.
    • Customs facilities.
  • Describe the berths:
    • Number.
    • Length.
    • Draft alongside (high tide and low tide).
    • Served by rail? Road? Sheds? Lighters only?
    • Availability.
  • Check the availability and cost of fuel. Outline what storage is available:
    • Determine what cargo handling equipment is available, including condition, fuel, and operators.
    • Heavy lift cranes (number, capacity).
    • Container and pallet handling (with port equipment? with ship’s gear only?).
  • Outline what storage is available:
    • Covered?
    • Hardstand space?
    • Capacity?
    • Quality?
    • Security?
  • Find out if pilots, tugs, and line handlers are available.
  • Specify the working hours for the port.
  • Specify the working hours for customs.
  • Determine whether arrangements can be made with the port and host-country authorities to obtain priority berthing for vessels delivering disaster relief shipments.
  • Identify an adequate number of personnel to tally and document cargo when received and transshipped.
  • Check the history of turnover time. What effect has the disaster had on turnover time?
  • Determine what repairs and/or auxiliary equipment would be needed to increase the port’s capacity. How soon can local authorities be expected to restore service?

e. Transfer Points

  • Identify transfer points by location.
  • Determine whether surface transportation for cargo is available from airports and seaports:
    • Road?
    • Railroad?
    • Canal/river?
  • Estimate the capacity of transfer points, including handling.
  • Outline what storage is available.
  • Describe security arrangements.
  • Identify an adequate number of personnel to receive and document cargo for transshipment.

f. Trucking

  • Describe damage to the road network as it relates to the possibility of delivering relief supplies by truck.
  • Indicate any restrictions, such as weight, width, length, or height limitations at bridges, tunnels, etc.
  • Determine whether bypassing damaged sections of the road network is possible and what weight restrictions would apply.
  • Determine whether containers can be moved inland:
    • 20-or 40-foot container sizes?
    • To the disaster site or to a transfer point?
  • Check the availability and cost of trucks owned by the government of the affected country.
  • Check the availability and cost of
    UN/PVO/NGO/IO-owned or operated vehicles.
  • Check the availability and cost of commercial vehicles.
  • Determine the types, sizes, and number of commercial vehicles available.
  • Judge whether the relief program could or should contract for any of the above trucks. What would be the freight rates per ton? What about collection for losses?
  • Ascertain that maintenance facilities and spare parts are available.
  • Outline measures to provide for security of cargo in transit.
  • Check the availability and cost of fuel.

g. Railroads

  • Identify and locate any railroads in the disaster-stricken area. Assess their current condition.
  • Describe any damage to the electrical power system.
  • Identify any interdictions—damaged bridges and tracks, fallen trees, etc.
  • If moving shipments between counties, determine if tracks are compatible.
  • Judge the reliability of the rail system.
  • Determine whether cars can be made available for relief shipments on a priority basis.
  • Determine the capacity and cost of rail shipments.
  • Outline security measures to protect cargo in transit.

h. Warehousing

  • Identify undamaged or damaged but usable warehouses located in reasonable proximity to the disaster site.
  • Determine the capacity of these warehouses.
  • Determine their availability over a specific period of time.
  • Specify whether the warehouses are government-owned, UN/PVO/NGO/IO-owned, or privately owned.
  • Determine whether they are staffed.
  • Determine the cost per square meter.
  • Assess the adequacy of the warehouses’ construction:
    • Ventilation?
    • Lighting?
    • Hard floor?
    • Fireproofing?
    • Loading docks?
    • Condition of roof (check during day)?
  • Describe available loading/unloading equipment:
    • Pallets.
    • Forklifts and fuel.
  • Ascertain that adequate security exists:
    • Perimeter fence.
    • Lighting.
    • Guards.
  • Determine whether any refrigeration is available.
  • Determine whether sorting and repackaging facilities exist.
  • Determine whether fumigation is necessary and if the warehouse is available for food, medicines, etc.
  • If assessing a functioning warehouse, determine:
    • Accounting and recordkeeping procedures.
    • Bin/stock cards on piles. (They must match the warehouse register.)
    • Physical inventory checks at random intervals.
    • Use of waybills.
    • Stacking methods.
    • Spacing system between rows.
    • Cleanliness.
    • Commodity handling system.
    • Reconstitution of damaged goods.
    • Prompt disposal of damaged goods.
    • First in/first out system.

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TOC: J. Assessment Checklists

Last updated: May 18, 2017