J. Assessment Checklists

12. Infrastructure

  • Determine the predisaster condition of the infrastructure.
  • Ascertain from the affected government the minimum needs for infrastructure recovery.

a. Communications

  • Describe where the system’s facilities are located.
  • Determine the broadcast/reception area or zone of influence (e.g., towns serviced by the system).
  • Identify the organization/firm responsible for operation and maintenance of the system. Is there a disaster response plan with identification of priority facilities, material supply, and priority screening of messages?
  • Obtain technical information, such as:
    • Broadcast power.
    • Operating frequencies, call signs.
    • Relay/transmission points.
    • Hours of operation.
    • Standby power sources.
    • Mobile capability.
    • Repair/maintenance facilities, including capabilities of manufacturer’s local agent.
    • Language of transmission.
  • Identify key personnel (owners, management, operations, maintenance).
  • Determine the degree of integration of military and civilian communications networks.
  • Note the source(s) of the above information.
  • Determine which communications facilities exist that are operable or easily repaired and could be used to pass on assessment information and assist in coordination of lifesaving responses.
  • Identify the type of system assessed:
    • Radio.
    • Private ownership.
    • Commercial.
    • Broadcast.
    • Two-way.
    • Amateur.
    • Citizens band.
    • Public systems.
    • Police.
    • Armed forces.
    • Government agencies. (Which ministries have communications facilities?)
    • Telephone.
    • Cable and wireless.
    • Television.
    • Newspaper.
    • Other.
  • Describe specific reasons why a system is not operating.
    • Unavailability of:
      • Personnel.
      • Power.
      • Fuel.
      • Access to facilities.
  • Damage to system:
    • Broadcast/transmission equipment.
    • Antennae.
    • Buildings.
    • Transmission lines.
    • Relay facilities.
    • Power source.
    • Other.
  • Note source(s) of the above information.
  • Outline options for restoring minimum essential services.
  • Identify local/regional suppliers of communications equipment and materials available for repair. Check cost and availability.
  • Determine the local/regional availability of technical services available for repair.

b. Electric Power

  • Describe the power system, including:
    • Baseload facility.
    • Peaking facility.
    • Number of units.
    • Fuel source.
    • Plant controls.
    • Output capability (specify voltage and cycle).
    • Mobile plants.
    • Other standby capability.
    • Switching facilities.
    • Transmission facilities.
    • Distribution facilities (number of substations).
    • Interconnections.
  • Inventory auxiliary equipment that may be available locally (e.g., from construction companies).
  • Determine why power is not available (i.e., at what point the system has been damaged).
  • Ascertain the condition of generating units.
  • Check the integrity of the fuel system.
  • Determine whether towers, lines, and/or grounding lines are down.
  • Assess the condition of substations.
  • Outline the impact of power loss on key facilities, such as hospitals and water pumping stations.
  • Describe the options for restoring minimum essential services.
  • Ascertain whether load shedding and/or switching to another grid can restore minimal services.
  • Identify local/regional suppliers of equipment and materials. Check the cost and availability.
  • Determine the local/regional availability of technical services available for repair.

c. Community Water Supply and Wastewater Treatment/Disposal

  • Describe the preexisting systems:
    • Water supply: sources, distribution system, pump stations, and treatment facilities.
    • Wastewater treatment/disposal: sewer lines, pump stations, and treatment facilities.
  • Estimate the number of people who depend on the various water sources.
  • Determine why water, especially potable water, is not available. Determine what points in the system are nonfunctional or damaged.
  • Check the integrity and quality of the water sources.
  • Assess the condition of water and wastewater treatment facilities and the condition of the distribution system. Are pump stations operational?
  • Determine whether water mains are broken. Are leaks in the sewer lines potentially contaminating the water supply?
  • Outline the impact of water loss on key facilities and individual users. How quickly can the responsible ministries be expected to restore services?
  • Describe options for restoring minimum essential services.
  • Evaluate possible alternative water sources.
  • Identify local/regional suppliers of equipment and materials. Check cost and availability.
  • Determine the local/regional availability of technical services available for repair.

d. Hydraulic Structures (Dams, Levees, Irrigation Canals, Hydropower Facilities)

  • Describe the function of the facilities, their proximity to the stricken area, and possible effects resulting from the disaster.
  • Identify the affected country organization that maintains and operates the facilities.
  • Identify the suppliers, contractors, and/or donors who constructed the structures. What were the equipment and technical sources?
  • Describe any damage to structures.
  • Check the stability of the structures and their appurte-nances. Is there any significant water leak from structures, appurtenances, or surrounding ground?
  • Identify any immediate or near-term safety risks (generating and control machinery, structural defects, power to operate gates, etc.). What are the risks to populations downstream associated with the failure of these structures and their appurtenances?
  • Assess the condition of canals or downstream channels. Are there any obstructions to the outlet works that constitute a hazard to hydraulic structures?
  • Identify any changes in watershed conditions (e.g., new developments, deforestation, changes in the river course, new impoundments).
  • Determine whether water is being contaminated.
  • Evaluate the management of the facilities.
  • Determine whether storage and outflow quantities are being managed in accordance with reservoir operation rules and procedure.
  • Identify preparations for follow-on storm conditions. For example, can water in a reservoir be drained during an emergency? What will be impacts on downstream population?
  • Describe the potential impacts of draining a reservoir on downstream areas and relief/response efforts (e.g., location of downstream population/settlements and infrastructure, depth at river crossings, condition of irrigation canals). Is there a need to impound water until downstream works can be repaired?
  • Outline the options for restoring minimum essential services and safety.
  • Outline the repair plans of the responsible affected country officials.
  • Check on any proposed assistance from the original donors of the facilities.
  • Identify local/regional sources of equipment and technical expertise.

e. Roads and Bridges

  • Describe the road networks in the affected area by type. What is the load capacity of the bridges?
  • Identify the responsible ministries and district offices and constraints on their operations.
  • Describe any damage to the network.
  • Determine which segments are undamaged, which can be traveled on with delays, and which are impassable.
  • Describe any damage by type:
    • Blockage by landslides, fallen trees, etc.
    • Embankments.
    • Drainage structures.
    • Bridges/tunnels.
    • Road surfaces.
  • Identify alternate crossings and/or routes.
  • Evaluate the importance of the road network to the relief effort and rehabilitation.
  • Outline the options for restoring minimum essential service.
  • Determine which elements must be restored first.
  • Describe the need for traffic control (police, military, other) on damaged or one-way segments.
  • Determine how long the emergency repairs can accommodate relief traffic (size, weight, volume). Will emergency maintenance and fuel points be needed in remote areas?
  • Identify the affected country agencies and military and/or civilian forces that are available to make repairs. Do they have equipment, spare parts, and maintenance support?
  • Check whether local or expatriate construction companies can loan equipment and/or expertise.
  • Check regional sources of equipment and/or expertise that are available for repair.
  • Ascertain that arrangements can be made for standby forces at damaged sections to keep roads open.

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Last updated: May 18, 2017