Deep Vein Thrombosis & Pulmonary Embolism

Deep Vein Thrombosis & Pulmonary Embolism is a topic covered in the CDC Yellow Book.

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Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a condition in which a blood clot develops in the deep veins, most commonly in the lower extremities. A pulmonary embolism occurs when a part of the clot breaks off and travels to the lungs, a potential life threat. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) refers to DVT, PE, or both. VTE is often recurrent, and long-term complications, such as postthrombotic syndrome after a DVT or chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension after a PE, are frequent.

Extended periods of limited mobility inherent to long-haul travel may increase a travelers’ risk for DVT/PE; an association between VTE and air travel was first reported in the early 1950s. Since then, as prolonged air travel has become more common (>300 million people take long-distance flights each year) concerns about travel-related VTE have become more prevalent.

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Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a condition in which a blood clot develops in the deep veins, most commonly in the lower extremities. A pulmonary embolism occurs when a part of the clot breaks off and travels to the lungs, a potential life threat. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) refers to DVT, PE, or both. VTE is often recurrent, and long-term complications, such as postthrombotic syndrome after a DVT or chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension after a PE, are frequent.

Extended periods of limited mobility inherent to long-haul travel may increase a travelers’ risk for DVT/PE; an association between VTE and air travel was first reported in the early 1950s. Since then, as prolonged air travel has become more common (>300 million people take long-distance flights each year) concerns about travel-related VTE have become more prevalent.

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