Injury & Trauma

Injury & Trauma is a topic covered in the CDC Yellow Book.

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Injury & Trauma

In 2015 and 2016, more than 1,700 US citizens died from nonnatural causes in foreign countries, excluding deaths in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Motor vehicle crashes—not crime or terrorism—are the number 1 cause of nonnatural deaths among US citizens living, working, or traveling abroad (Figure 3-1). In 2015 and 2016, 484 Americans died in vehicle crashes in foreign countries (28% of nonnatural deaths). Another 312 died of suicide (18%); 309 were victims of homicide (18%), and 307 drowned or died as a result of a boating incident (17%).

Figure 3-1.Leading causes of injury death for US citizens in foreign countries, 2015 & 2016 1, 2, 3, 4
Figure 3-1.Leading causes of injury death for US citizens in foreign countries, 2015 & 20161,2,3,4

1 Data from US Department of State. Deaths of US citizens in foreign countries by nonnatural causes. Washington, DC: US Department of State; [cited 2018 Mar 1]. Available from: https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/international-travel/while-abroad/death-abroad1/death-statistics.html.

2 Excludes deaths of US citizens fighting wars in Afghanistan or Iraq, and deaths that were not reported to the US embassy or consulate.

3 “Motor Vehicle” includes deaths classified as “vehicle accidents,” including the following subcategories: auto, bus, motorcycle, pedestrian, train, and other.

4 “All Other” includes deaths classified as armed conflict, disaster, hostage-related, natural disaster, other accident, and undetermined/unknown.

Countries may lack emergency care that approximates US standards; trauma centers capable of providing optimal care for serious injuries are uncommon outside urban areas, if they exist at all. Travelers should be aware of the increased risk of certain injuries while traveling or residing internationally, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, and take preventive steps to reduce the chances of serious injury. (For information on motor vehicle crashes and road safety, see Chapter 8, Road & Traffic Safety.)

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Injury & Trauma

In 2015 and 2016, more than 1,700 US citizens died from nonnatural causes in foreign countries, excluding deaths in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Motor vehicle crashes—not crime or terrorism—are the number 1 cause of nonnatural deaths among US citizens living, working, or traveling abroad (Figure 3-1). In 2015 and 2016, 484 Americans died in vehicle crashes in foreign countries (28% of nonnatural deaths). Another 312 died of suicide (18%); 309 were victims of homicide (18%), and 307 drowned or died as a result of a boating incident (17%).

Figure 3-1.Leading causes of injury death for US citizens in foreign countries, 2015 & 2016 1, 2, 3, 4
Figure 3-1.Leading causes of injury death for US citizens in foreign countries, 2015 & 20161,2,3,4

1 Data from US Department of State. Deaths of US citizens in foreign countries by nonnatural causes. Washington, DC: US Department of State; [cited 2018 Mar 1]. Available from: https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/international-travel/while-abroad/death-abroad1/death-statistics.html.

2 Excludes deaths of US citizens fighting wars in Afghanistan or Iraq, and deaths that were not reported to the US embassy or consulate.

3 “Motor Vehicle” includes deaths classified as “vehicle accidents,” including the following subcategories: auto, bus, motorcycle, pedestrian, train, and other.

4 “All Other” includes deaths classified as armed conflict, disaster, hostage-related, natural disaster, other accident, and undetermined/unknown.

Countries may lack emergency care that approximates US standards; trauma centers capable of providing optimal care for serious injuries are uncommon outside urban areas, if they exist at all. Travelers should be aware of the increased risk of certain injuries while traveling or residing internationally, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, and take preventive steps to reduce the chances of serious injury. (For information on motor vehicle crashes and road safety, see Chapter 8, Road & Traffic Safety.)

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