Appendix E: Taking Animals & Animal Products Across International Borders

Appendix E: Taking Animals & Animal Products Across International Borders is a topic covered in the CDC Yellow Book.

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Traveling Abroad with A Pet

Travelers planning to take a companion animal to a foreign country must meet the entry requirements of that country and transportation guidelines of the airline. To get destination country information, travelers should contact the country’s embassy in Washington, DC, or the nearest consulate (see www.usembassy.gov/). The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) pet travel website is another resource for destination country requirements (see www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/pet-travel). Additionally, travelers can check with airline companies for their guidelines. Travelers should be aware that long flights can be hard on pets, particularly older animals with chronic health conditions, very young animals, and short-nosed breeds, such as bulldogs and Persian cats, which may be predisposed to respiratory stress. Additionally, upon reentering the United States, pets that traveled abroad are subject to the same import requirements as animals that never lived in the United States.

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Traveling Abroad with A Pet

Travelers planning to take a companion animal to a foreign country must meet the entry requirements of that country and transportation guidelines of the airline. To get destination country information, travelers should contact the country’s embassy in Washington, DC, or the nearest consulate (see www.usembassy.gov/). The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) pet travel website is another resource for destination country requirements (see www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/pet-travel). Additionally, travelers can check with airline companies for their guidelines. Travelers should be aware that long flights can be hard on pets, particularly older animals with chronic health conditions, very young animals, and short-nosed breeds, such as bulldogs and Persian cats, which may be predisposed to respiratory stress. Additionally, upon reentering the United States, pets that traveled abroad are subject to the same import requirements as animals that never lived in the United States.

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